Tuesday, August 6, 2013

GEDmatch

I've been having fun playing with the Predict Eye Color at GEDmatch.  By uploading the results of my DNA test (which I took through Ancestry.com), the test predicted the following color:

Picture from GEDmatch
My eyes are a a lot lighter in color overall, especially near the outside of the iris, but the brown in the eye above is in my eye around the pupil.

My eye without flash (left) and with flash.
I did read their page on accuracy which says, "FTDNA Illumina and Ancestry.Com results may provide a prediction, but generally there are not enough of the necessary SNPs for it to be accurate."  That being said, I think it was a pretty close match.  Not exact, but close.

The Predict Eye Color test doesn't really tell me anything about my genetic ancestors, but since becoming interested in genetics, I have discovered that my brown eyes are not actually brown at all, but amber.  Pretty neat!  Maybe I should change my driver's license.

The test says, "Read rules from top to bottom. In some cases, a rule cancels out results from rules above it."  The rules are based off of the SNP's (single-nucleotide polymorphism- see SNPedia).  But basically, as one reads down the results of the test, a result can be canceled out.  So, though one result lists a "weak amber gradient", the VERY next result lists "inhibit weak amber gradient."  ROFL!!!   But as you can see from my picture, I do have quite a bit of amber in my eyes.

One result lists that I have a gray ring around the outer edge of the iris, which I do.  I didn't even realize that I had that!!  How neat-o!!
Another fun test is their Rare SNP (Minor Allele) mutation test.  Now, we all have genes that have mutated.  This does not qualify you to join the X-Men (so sorry).  It does qualify you to learn the various diseases that may occur because of these mutations.  I will keep in mind that my DNA may indicate that I should really keep an eye out (at least while they are working) for signs of retinal and macular degeneration.

I am no expert at genetics and so I am going to be participating in some GEDmatch groups at Facebook to learn more about how to interpret the results.  Pretty cool stuff.

1 comment:

Chad said...
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